About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18
: boesh terse city across and shreveport louisiana. this lady that's on your show, what a breath of fresh air chongging to do right for us folks out here. god bless you. okay. my point is you've got to bear with me. christopher dodd was walking down the hallway on c-span cameras. they captured him saying this: why aren't you going to run for senate and his words were country why isn't going to let me. senator dodd and senator conrad both got some kind of loans through countrywide. senator conrad just retired and he didn't run for the senate. now those were his words. c-span has it on camera pity and i want to know if you have investigated them in any way. and thank god for c-span. >> host: thanks, charles. >> caller: let me >> guest: let me plant to things. we are working for everyone. if you ask me who i represent, i represent you. i represent everyone. because we all pay for this bailout and we are continuing to pay for the bailout. so i appreciate that. as to what we are investigating i have to be sensitive to the i will try to give as much transparency as i can. but i have federal age
there are some 130 cities that american airlines serve that u.s. airways doesn't serve, 62 cities u.s. there raise fares that american airlines doesn't serve. when we make decisions about serving in the market particularly small and medium-sized markets there is an economic calculus we undertake and that economic calculus involves determining whether revenue potential is and subtracting if you will be projected costs. we look at news service, one of the big costs are developing infrastructure, recruiting and training employees, creating a marketing presence in the community. in pennsylvania where there are a number of communities u.s. there raise fares and american airlines doesn't serve that infrastructure exists, we have quality employees there already and a great marketing presence. those are great opportunities for expanding service from the american airlines hub of. >> we're looking for opportunities to expand like johnstown, pa.. related facilities at u.s. there currently at pittsburgh included operations center that employs 1500 people. old americans has operations center in
're working with states and cities who have filed lawsuits. and the other way to get that information is the result of lawsuits that have been filed, discrimination lawsuits. so that is some place you can start. but when you have national organizations who are willing, particularly black police officers, who are willing to step out on the front lines to give you that data and that information, i would encourage you to communicate with them. >> all right. well, this has been an extraordinarily informative panel and you see by the testimony so to speak of these experts that this is a vital and critical problem that we have to confront. and it has real consequences on actually existing people, on flesh and blood folk, most of whom are ours. whether black or latino or asian or indigenous people or the like. the reality is all of this intellectual and academic and cerebrally intense stuff we're talking about has application. that's no reason to dislodge the centrality of the academic and the abstract and the theory because the reality is, given what this panel has spoken about, and profess
leavy in oklahoma city and public service as a u.s. magistrate in the western district of oklahoma. as evidence of his career and distinction, when judge bacharach was chosen to be a magistrate judge from a pool of many well-qualified candidates, the chief judge characterized the decision as an easy one. since that time, his colleagues have characterized his service as remarkable, demonstrating superb judicial temperament and a real asset to the western district family and the legal community. as with any position in the judicial branch that comes with a lifetime appointment, the senate must deliberate carefully, and we did and gave all the thought to this nominee, and as was shown and clearly demonstrated by a unanimous vote of confirmation. you don't see this very often but you saw it with judge bacharach. so i appreciate the opportunity to support him today and to have been able to call and be the first to congratulate him in this new part of his career, which we will be very, very proud and i can assure the chair and all the rest of them that this is a guy that we will always b
it's indiscriminate killing, and in the old days you'd throw a rock over the walls of the city, and you didn't see who you killed. if the prophet muhammad used catapults, that means if he lived today, he would use nuclear weapons. people tend to say, oh, that's just religion, people are rational. which isn't quite true. religious fault lines in the middle east are critical. i think once iran goes nuclear, i think we're going to have a severe shia/sunni fortnight, threatening the sunni dominance in the world -- in the middle east. we will probably see very close to that a pakistani, a nuclear presence, a pakistani-extended deterrence in saudi arabia. the saudis finance the pakistani nuclear program. they have a prior agreement with them that if saudi arabia calls for it, they will provide them with nuclear weapons. i doubt that the pakistanis will just deliver a bomb. they would probably station elements in the region, and this would, is going to raise a question regarding for the first time a pakistani second-strike capability against india which would certainly complicate the
of the world's international cities. people coming from all backgrounds. you are well placed to understand what immigration and the opportunities and contributions that immigrants and those who come to this country for a better opportunity can contribute. and i thank you so very much for your leadership and your presence here today. welcome, fellow texans. i yield back. >> i now turn to the former chairman of the committee and the gentleman from san antonio, texas. mr. smith, ford 15 seconds of welcome. >> yes, i would like to welcome the mayor. as we both know, san antonio is a wonderfully livable, tri-cultural city. and he has done a great job representing us in so many ways. i also want to say that i enjoyed serving with your brother in congress, who was sitting behind you as well. >> welcome to all of our witnesses, and we begin with mr. vivek wadhwa. >> thank you for letting me speak with you. being here in washington dc, everything about being here, we worry about china, whether they are going to be the road to the future. we worry about shortages and everything in the world. when you are
, in some of the larger cities and then some smaller independent operators in smaller cities. a good part of the traffic has been people who stream it online. that is pretty dedicated following. in fact, with the very large online content it was 40% of that comes from the united states. >> host: so that is the appetite? >> guest: there is appetite clearly. online streamers. >>ing are fresh should have content to have people cross over. >> al-jazeera purchased current tv in december last year. just month 1/2 ago. how about expanding the american audience. who will you reach right now? >> potentially estimated 50 million viewers. if you talk going 4 1/2 million homes to 50 million homes, obviously a great leap forrd -- forward. one of the things we fought for years was distribution in the meshes. this opens some eyeballs to us and we hope we'll give people a chance to see our coverage, to sample it from those that haven't seen it and provide another platform for the core audience that we already have. >> here are some facts about al-jazeera english channel. it is a 24 hour global news netwo
of the very practices under shaken by the city units that you once operated. for example, as treasury secretary he would be responsible for coordinating implementation of the so-called looker rules, which is intended to separate proprietary trading from the federally insured financial activities. you stated that you support the rule, and yet you were the chief operating officer for the units engaged in the sort of the activities the rule was meant to prevent. therefore if you were to be confirmed it could lead to an awkward situation in which your role as the chair of the fsoc from tester of the fsoc coming to effectively saying to the financial firms do as i say, not as i did. now these are not trivial matters. indeed, they bear directly on your qualifications to serve as the next treasury secretary. if the committee was given time to examine the record more thoroughly before today's hearing, i'm sure many of the questions that have already been answered. we have to explore some of these matters here today. finally, i just want to mention that when we met the nomination i told you th
advantage of it, without unduly exposing it to our adversaries. let me move on to private city and civil liberties. anytime you're talking about sharing the information, sharing information with respect to cybersecurity, you have to be conscious of privacy and civil liberties and you have to make sure those are protected. that has been a priority of the administration and it continues to be so. so, while there are perhaps fewer concerns in the executive order because the focus is on sharing information outward, we have established a robust, oversight regime and in particular we have highlighted the fips. that is the government speak, right? if i don't insert an acronym every two or three minutes it is just not fun. the fips are the fair information practice principles. these date back to the 1970's when they were developed dealing with health records. essentially it is what are the principles you need to use in considering privacy with respect to information? so we think it's important we establish these as a one of the principles that we're going to follow with respect to sharing inform
destroys city after city, destroyed washington, d.c., burned down the white house. next stop, baltimore but as they came into the chesapeake bay, the armada of ships, warships a source of the eye could see, it was looking grim. fort mchenry standing right there. general armistead who was in charge of fort mchenry had a large american flag commission to fly in front of the fort. the admiral in charge of the british fleet was offended and said take that flag down. you have until dusk until you take that flag and but if you don't we will reduce you to ashes. there was a young amateur poet on board by the name of francis scott key, sent by president madison to try to obtain the release of an american physician who was being held captive. he overheard the british plans they were not going to let them off the ship. he mourned as dusk approached. he more for his fledgling young nation. and as the sun set, then bartman's, missiles, so much debris, he strained trying to see was the flag still there? he couldn't see a thing. all night long a continued. at the crack of dawn he ran out to the banis
give them those tools under this tax -- child tax credit legislation. sanctuary cities reform would prohibit appropriated funds from being used in contravention of the illegal immigration reform and immigrant responsibility act of 1986. and i'm joined by senators grassley and senator fischer in that legislation. too many jurisdictions in the united states are self-proclaimed sanctuary cities, and by doing that they are in contravention of federal immigration law when they say they will not cooperate in the enforcement of that law in any way. that's unacceptable and those cities should not get appropriated funds. everify, i mentioned, is an initiative and legislation by senator grassley. i'm proud to join him as a coauthor. i'm an original cosponsor of that bill. it would take the present everify system and make it mandatory and expand it so that is our work force system of enforcement. everify works. the problem is, it's a pilot. it's not mandatory and it's not broad enough, and we need to broaden and make mandatory that workable everify system. the voter integrity protection act. i
, it's not like you're a city or you're a county, or your state government or your household or your business. we budget off of projections in growth. so the task a year or so ago was for a group of six republicans and six democrats to come up with $1.2 trillion. it's beyond belief that that did not occur. so sequester was put in place as a mechanism to ensure that there at least was some slowing of growth. the first seven months of the sequester is the most ham-handed portion of it and it's cut at the p.p.a. level, it's across the board, and focused on two important categories. i agree that it's ham-handed and the only thing worse than sequestration in my opinion would be kicking the can down the road on some much-needed fiscal discipline here in washington. so i hope that would we'll do today is get behind a very thoughtful proposal that would say look, we're still going to reduce spending by this amount, but we're going to give the executive branch, because this first seven months is handled so differently than what happens after that --, after that, by the way, appropriators live
. if somebody applied in the, to the mexico city u.s. embassy in january of 2007, and someone else crossed the border and is here in january of 2008, we all agree that the person who waited in line in 2007 should be able to get that green card before the person in 2008. we have to figure out how to do that so it's not an interminalably long period of time, that people are old or dead before they become. at the same time we have to make sure that this principle is kept because that helps us pass a bill. one other point i would make. we made two exceptions to that. dick durbin worked very hard on the dream act. we all agreed that should get special priority. >> young people born here as children? >> yeah. second we'll need something special for agriculture because it is a different situation. virtually whether you're in new york dairy country or arizona ranching country you can't get americans to do this kind of work. >> we're about to get the hook. my penultimate question, senator mccain, have you talked to speaker boehner about this? >> no but i did hear this statement a couple days ago wh
threat towards seoul, north korean, artillery pieces and rocket launchers that can destroy the city of seoul in a matter of minutes or a few hours, if the north koreans unleash this weaponry. and they have this kind of deterrence. to threaten us and they have had it for a long period of time and we are very, very cognizant about this. another related issue in this connection though is that once north korea mounts nuclear warheads on its missiles, how is, how is that going to affect the retaliation policy? that was established between the united states and south korea in 2010, following the shelling of the young pong island in november of 2010. policy that in the future south korea would have the right to retaliate militarily, if north korea committed future provocations and the u.s. would support that kind of retaliation. what is going to happen to the u.s. and the rok attitude towards the retaliation policy once north korea has nuclear war ahead on its missiles and can threaten to rain nuclear missiles down on south korea, if south korea does retaliate? how are we going to react to
york, i'm troubled about the emerging threats as new york city is a top tear row target. we have two missions for wmd under the national guard, cutting those programs, obviously, puts us at grave risk. we have a lot of national guard contingencies and operations throughout the state which is essential for recovery efforts. we saw what an amazing job they did in hurricane sandy so i'm very concerned that with these cuts, we expose ourselves to vulnerabilities. cyber threats is the greatest threat. we do a lot of work for them in the labs, and i'm worried about our training. obviously, it's one of the premier trading operations we have for the army, and we have to keep the resources available. i'd like you to briefly talk about if you can quantify, how are the risks now elevated because of the cuts? >> well, senator, i'll answer briefly and see if one of the chiefs, in terms of their service,ment to respond. you asked the right question. how is risk elevated? so what we provide a deterrent against enemies and assurance of the allies, and then where we can't do as much deterrence or ass
, and by his quiet city leadership of the church in uncertain times. people of all nations have been blessed by the sacrifice to sow the seeds of hope, justice and compassion throughout the world in the name of our lord and savior. again, that from house speaker john boehner. in about an hour we will be taking live to an alliance for health reform briefing on medicare policy and the future of the program for an overview looking at how medicare respond to the beneficiaries are, and what changes could occur once the health colossal implemented in 2014. we will have that live at 12:15 eastern on c-span2. the senate begins its work today at 2 p.m. eastern. they will continue work on the violence against women act which could reauthorize the bill for five years. last week senators agreed to consider six amendments to the bill and they will begin voting on those amendments today at 5:30 p.m. eastern. live coverage right here on c-span2. up next, a look at reconstruction in afghanistan. from this morning's "washington journal." >> host: on monday in a last hour of "washington journal" we take a loo
can change that cities good ideas can be heard? >> congressman, it comes down to at the ministry of and congressional demand that the mission itself would be effectively carried out. then there has to be a focus and oversight the best way to do that and whether the department of homeland security is implementing it so the extent that if they go back to the suspects in the defense committee the question is are there better ideas that can infect the incorporated command can refine the methodology to do that other than the general contractor type of approach? as we know, the typical approach of the government particularly the dhs is too high year a big player and the innovative small business people that you're talking about simply become players as subcontractors to read the question is can we find a way to make sure that we are fully engaged in the most innovative small business people as they come up with new and innovative ideas and that is an administrative approach within the congress can rightly demand. >> we now recognize you for a question. >> spending tax dollars wisely li
's from huffington post. to bonnie, let's go to our republican line next, to nicholas in new york city. nicholas, welcome. >> caller: well, it's great to be here, and thank you, and i'll try to make it brief, and let me apologize to the others waiting on line. i just, very quickly, you know, i came here as a child in 1966, and they moved us up to the bronx. we came here through red cross auspices. and, you know, my dad and mom worked two and three jobs, eventually they bought real estate because they saved their money. we were subsistence farmers back home -- >> host: nicholas, where -- where was back home? you said you came here in '66. where was back home? >> caller: montenegro today on border of albanian on the coast of adriatic sea. we were albanian catholics. in fact, we were a minority amongst other minorities, but we were the minority. >> host: back to our question, how do you think these budget cuts will affect you? >> guest: well, i've been watching this thing, and it seems like i've seen this movie before. now, i've worked very hard as my mom and daddied, as my brothers do, a
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18